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To find out more, please contact the Dietetic Department on:

T: 020 7234 2359 E:

[email protected]

FODMAP

FOURTEEN

FODMAPs

The Low

FODMAP Diet

What are FODMAPs?

FODMAP

s are found in a

vast array of the foods we eat.

FODMAP

s is an acronym for:

F

ermentable

O

ligosaccharides (e.g. fructans

and galactans)

D

isaccharides (e.g. lactose)

M

onosaccharides (e.g. excess

fructose)

A

nd

P

olyols (e.g. sorbitol, mannitol,

maltitol, xylitol and isomalt)

Where are FODMAPs found?

A few examples of common food

sources for each of the

FODMAP

s

are listed below.This list is by no means

exhaustive, the dietitians at London

Bridge Hospital will be able to provide

up to date details of the full list of foods

during a consultation.

Excess fructose:

apples, corn

syrup solids, high fructose corn syrup,

honey, mango, pear, watermelon.

Fructans:

artichokes (globe and

Jerusalem), asparagus, beetroot,

chicory, dandelion leaves, garlic (in

large quantities), leek, onion (brown,

white, Spanish, onion powder),

raddichio lettuce, rye (in large

amounts), spring onion (white part

only), wheat (in large amounts), inulin

(found naturally in many of

the foodstuffs listed above, as well

as in many processed foods as a

sugar, fat or flour replacement),

fructo-oligosaccharides.

Galacto-Oligosaccharides

(GOS):

chickpeas, legume beans

(e.g. baked beans, borlotti beans,

kidney beans), lentils.

Lactose:

milk, condensed and

evaporated milk custard, dairy

desserts, ice-cream, margarine, milk

powder, soft unripened cheeses

(e.g. ricotta, cottage, cream,

marscarpone), yoghurt.

Polyols:

apples, apricots,

avocado, cherries, longon, lychee,

mushrooms, nectarines, pears,

plums, prunes, sorbitol (420),

mannitol (421), xylitol (967),

maltitol (965) and isomalt (953).

What can be eaten on a low

FODMAP diet?

The low

FODMAP

diet involves

many dietary changes that are best

described to a patient in consultation

with a dietitian. For expert dietitian

advice, please contact the Dietetic

Department.

The Dietetic Service is available to

all inpatients and outpatients during

their treatment. Each member of the

Dietetic Department is a registered

dietitian holding current registration

with the Health Professions Council

(HPC), member of the British

Dietetic Association (BDA) and

registered provider with medical

insurance companies.

The low FODMAP diet originated in Australia and was developed by a team at Monash

University in Melbourne following extensive research in 2001. It has now been successfully

adapted to the UK by researchers at King’s College London and implemented in the private

sector by the Dietetics Department at London Bridge Hospital.

FODMAPs can be found in many of

the foods we eat. FODMAPs is an

acronym referring to

F

ermentable,

O

ligosaccharides,

D

isaccharides,

M

onosaccharides

A

nd

P

olyols.

These short chain carbohydrates (e.g.

fructans, galacto-oligosaccharides,

polyols, fructose and lactose) can be

poorly absorbed in some patients’

small intestine. Ingestion of FODMAPs

leads to alterations in fluid content

and bacterial fermentation in the colon

triggering functional gut symptoms

in susceptible individuals. Removing

FODMAPs from the diet can be a

highly effective means of improving the

symptoms of people with functional

gut disorders such as Irritable Bowel

Syndrome (IBS). Symptoms of IBS

include abdominal bloating and

distension, excess wind (flatulence),

abdominal pain, nausea, changes in

bowel habits (diarrhoea, constipation

or a combination of both), and other

gastro-intestinal symptoms.